The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement

Where Conservatism Went Wrong:
A Review of The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement

2,310 words

Paul E. Gottfried & Richard B. Spencer (eds.)
The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement
Arlington, Va.: Washington Summit Publishers, 2015buckley

All political movements need a history, and such histories, if well-constructed, almost always coalesce into myth. Once mythologized, a movement’s past can inform its present members about its reason for being, its need for continuing, and its plans for the future. And this can be accomplished quickly – and without the need for study or research – in the form of what Edmund Burke called “prejudice.” “Prejudice,” Burke says, “is of ready application in the emergency; it previously engages the mind in a steady course of wisdom and virtue, and does not leave the man hesitating in the moment of decision, skeptical, puzzled, and unresolved.”

Prejudice is a time-saver, in other words, and it puts everyone on the same page. These are two invaluable things for any movement which aims to effect political change. For those who wish to participate in any of the various factions of the Alt Right and learn its history and myth, they do not need to go much farther than The Great Purge: The Deformation of the Conservative Movement.

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The Alt Right And The Arts

The Alt Right & the Arts

2,386 words

Vig Scholma

Vig Scholma, Furor Teutonicus

The Road to Alt Right Artistry

Since Hillary Clinton’s mention of the Alternative Right in one of her speeches, there have been countless discussions about what the Alt Right is and represents, with everyone and anyone, no matter how inappropriate, suddenly declaring they are part of the Alt Right. I think it is quite easy to define what the Alt Right is: it is the postmodern manifestation of what Julius Evola termed the True Right. 

The True Right has been almost completely disprivileged from the mainstream arts scene in the present day. The political Left, meaning firstly the Whiggish Left and then the socialist Left, realized as early as the late eighteenth century the power art had to shape political discourse by altering the masses’ perceptions of the world. They thus sought to seize the artistic mainstream as a means towards political power.

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The Franco-German Rivalry: A Recent Conflict

The Franco-German Rivalry:
A Recent Conflict

1,385 words

Translated by Guillaume Durocher

Translator’s Note:

The following is translated from Dominique Venner’s Histoire de la Collaboration

(Paris: Gérard Watelet/Pygmalion, 2000), 151-54. The title is editorial.

In The Birth of Two Peoples, the great medievalist Carlrichard Brühl demonstrated the extent to which the consciousness of a common origin [between Frenchmen and Germans] was still felt at the time of Saint Louis.[1][2]

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Kevin Beary’s Savaged States of America

Kevin Beary’s Savaged States of America

2,006 words

Kevin Beary

Thomas Hart Benton, Cradling Wheat
Thomas Hart Benton, Cradling Wheat

Savaged States of America: A Futuristic Fantasy
In Qua Urbe, 1998

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”—Lewis Carroll, the White Queen, Through the Looking Glass 

“Modern life’s absurdities render the satirist’s role redundant.”—Anon.

“Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other”—Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac

 “The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule.”—H. L. Mencken

Kevin Beary’s dystopian novel about mid twenty-first century America is one of the better latter-day efforts directed at white nationalists, and it is surprising to me that it is not more popular with its target audience. Beary is a natural-born fiction writer; he has the uncanny ability to paint with words as all of the memorable novelists have been able to do.

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Kerry Bolton’s Perón and Perónism

Kerry Bolton’s Perón & PerónismPeronandPeronism-182x300

4,570 words

Kerry Bolton
Perón and Perónism
London: Black House Publishing, 2014

Perón and Perónism is an excellent resource on the political thought of Argentina’s three-time president Juan Domingo Perón. It places him firmly among the elite ranks of Third Position thinkers. His doctrine of Justicalism and his geopolitical agenda of resistance to both American and Soviet domination of Latin America have demonstrated enduring relevance. Influenced by Aristotle’s conception of man as a social being and the social teachings of the Catholic Church, Perón proved to be an insightful political philosopher, developing a unique interpretation of National Syndicalism that guided his Justicalist Party. While his career was marked by turmoil, he pursued an agenda of the social justice, seeking the empowerment of the nation’s working classes as a necessary step towards the spiritual transformation of the country. Perón’s example stands as a beacon to those who seek the liberation of man from the bondage of materialism, and the liberation of the nation from foreign domination.

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What Do Identitarians Want?

What Do Identitarians Want?

2,971 words

Part 1 of 2prometheustatue-201x300

As Britons, European-Americans, or native Europeans, we are all instinctively aware that something is deeply wrong with our society. However, the language used to describe this problem is kept within the extremely narrow confines of mainstream conservatism.

For example, most indigenous Britons are interested in “UKIP,” think we should “get out of Europe,” “stop immigration,” “ban the Burqa,” and so on. All literal, objective terminology on matters racial and cultural in the West is now taboo and channeled into ineffectual proxy issues.

This is based on the baby-logic of “because Hitler was a racialist, therefore, all racialism leads to Hitler” and the perpetual distraction of ballot-box populism. So this is a problem. However, within the ideological box of the New Right our philosophy, values, and goals have been developing, and we are developing new terminology to express this. We will fix all of this and more by attacking the root cause of this miasma.

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Race & the Myth of the Origins of Rome

Race & the Myth of the Origins of Rome

2,511 words

Translated by Cologero

In his Life of Romulus (I,8), Plutarch writes:Romulus-Remus-260x146

Rome would not have risen to such power had it not had, in any way, a divine origin, such as to offer to the eyes of men something great and inexplicable.

Cicero repeats the same thing (Nat. Deor. II,3,8) then going on to consider (Har. Resp., IX, 19) the Roman civilization as that which through sacred knowledge surpassed every other people or nation: omnes gentes nationesque superavivums. For the ancient Romans, Sallust has the expression religiosissimi mortales [the most religious mortals].

On the other hand, in our day all of that is fantasy or superstition for many “serious” persons and many “critical” minds. The “facts” are the only things that count for them. The mythical traditions of the ancients have no value, or they have it only insofar as it is supposed that, here and there, they are confused reflections of real events, that is to say, tangibly historical. There is, in that, a fundamental misunderstanding that was already denounced, to a certain degree by our Giambattista Vico, then by Schelling, still more recently by Bachofen and, finally, by the most recent school of the metaphysical interpretation of myth, and by those little known today (Guénon, W. R. Otto, Altheim, Kerényi, etc.). According to all these writers, the mystical traditions are neither arbitrary creations more or less on the poetic and fantastic plane, nor deformations and transpositions of historical elements. Especially in regard to origins, it was correctly pointed out that symbols and legends,

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1492: The Clash of Civilizations & the Grey Legend

1492: The Clash of Civilizations & the Grey Legend

911 words

Salvador Dalí, The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, 1959
Salvador Dalí, The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, 1959

In Latin America, the voices that seek to give a poetic tinge to the past so as to legitimize their chosen future decided to name Columbus Day, October the 12th, Día de la Raza, the “Day of the Race.”

Expressions and meanings are not always univocal, and what in Iberia could be understood as the presence of the same race both on the peninsula and on the other side of the sea, in America came to carry a brand new meaning. Anything could result from the clash of one culture against many, as well as the interaction between two races, but never a race, although political correctness insists constantly on the origin of a new race born from the clash of civilizations. Either that, or a bloody and genocidal invasion.

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The Revolutionary Conservative Critique of Oswald Spengler

The Revolutionary Conservative Critique of Oswald Spengler

2,727 words

Oswald Spengler
Oswald Spengler

Oswald Spengler is by now well-known as one of the major thinkers of the German Conservative Revolution of the early 20th Century. In fact, he is frequently cited as having been one of the most determining intellectual influences on German Conservatism of the interwar period – along with Arthur Moeller van den Bruck and Ernst Jünger – to the point where his cultural pessimist philosophy is seen to be representative of Revolutionary Conservative views in general (although in reality most Revolutionary Conservatives held more optimistic views).[1] 

To begin our discussion, we shall provide a brief overview of the major themes of Oswald Spengler’s philosophy.[2] According to Spengler, every High Culture has its own “soul” (this refers to the essential character of a Culture) and goes through predictable cycles of birth, growth, fulfillment, decline, and demise which resemble that of the life of a plant. To quote Spengler:

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Daniel Forrest’s Suprahumanism

Daniel Forrest’s Suprahumanism

4,072 wordssuprahumanism-cover-with-margins-189x300

Daniel S. Forrest
Suprahumanism: European Man and the Regeneration of History
London: Arktos, 2014

Given my interests in topics covered in my Nietzsche’s Coming God book review, as well as my Overman High Culture essay, I thought it useful to take a look at Daniel Forrest’s new book, Suprahumanism.

The concept of Suprahumanism is defined by the author based on the following tenets: aristocratic conception of human individuals, the importance of honor, a heroic attitude toward the challenges of life, exalting this world and not some mystical afterlife or “world beyond,” strength and beauty and health, and the fusion of morality and aesthetics. The author notes that the European mind and soul is Faustian, it wants to know everything, is interested in everything, and wants to grasp the reality of everything. This contrasts to the Church’s “thou shalt not know,” the promotion of ignorance and weakness, the “lesson” that man was ejected from “paradise” for “eating the fruit from the tree of knowledge.” Thus one contrasts Suprahumanist ethics with those of Christianity. The author’s negative view of Christianity is, in my opinion, a positive. He contrasts ethnocentric Judaism and universalist Christianity:

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